Acceptability Use Policy

Preparing students for the 21st century workplace involves teaching and exposing students to various types of technology they will encounter.  Students should feel comfortable being able to email, share documents, present information electronically, research online, etc.  School districts are providing more and more technological resources in the form of computer labs, laptops, mobile devices, and so on.

Opening up the world wide web for students can open up a can of worms so to speak.  How can we ensure that students are using the technology responsibly?  One measure is to have a very clear and concise Acceptable Use Policy.

The National Education Association suggests that an effective AUP contain the following six key elements:

  • a preamble,
  • a definition section,
  • a policy statement,
  • an acceptable uses section,
  • an unacceptable uses section, and
  • a violations/sanctions section.

Students need to be aware that when using technology in a school, it needs to be specifically for school use only.  Districts have the ability to track all computers history which helps alleviate some of the desire to roam throughout the internet.  The key is to ensuring students use the internet properly is that they are TAUGHT specifically what it means to be a responsible user.  Students need to be expected to uphold that behavior and if they don’t there are consistent and clear consequences.

At the beginning of every year, my school teaches a responsible computing portion of our freshman seminar course.  This provides a means to present our guidelines to all students.  Examples of poor behavior are given and the consequences that follow.  Students are expected to treat others online as they would in person.

Some examples of AUP’s:

  1. SVVSD Laptop Policy
  2. Colorado State AUP
  3. Brush School District AUP
  4. Colorado AUP general guidelines

 

References:

Getting Started on the Internet: Developing an Acceptable Use Policy (AUP).  Retrieved from http://www.educationworld.com/a_curr/curr093.shtml

 

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Posted on June 24, 2013, in 1.1 Instructional Systems Design, 1.3 Instructional Strategies, 2.3 Computer-Based Technologies, 3.3 Implementation and Institutionalization, 3.4 Policies and Regulations. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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